Mark Wells, CEO of Games Workshop Steps Down

Via Faeit 212

UPDATE - There's been a  new, re worded release on this
"GAMES WORKSHOP GROUP PLC

Games Workshop Group announces a change in Senior Management

For the past five years Games Workshop has had the best CEO it has ever had. Under Mark’s leadership we have become better organised, clearer thinking and robust commercially.

It will come as a real shock, therefore, to learn he is leaving.

The needs of the business over the last few years has meant there has been a gradual overlapping of the roles of Chairman and CEO. Recently this has become so complete that, after discussions together, Mark and Tom have agreed that the CEO’s role, as it stands, is redundant.

Mark is looking forward to planning what he does next and he does so with our best wishes and heartfelt thanks."
The original is below.
"GAMES WORKSHOP GROUP PLC

Games Workshop Group announces a change in Senior Management

For the past five years Games Workshop has had the best CEO it has ever had.  Under Mark Wells’ leadership we have become better organised, clearer thinking and commercially more robust.

The needs of the business over the last few years has meant there has been a gradual overlapping of the roles of Chairman and CEO.  Recently this has become so complete that, after discussions together, Mark and Tom have agreed that the CEO’s role, as it stands, is redundant.

Tom will incorporate the role of Acting CEO into his position as Chairman and, whilst it will undoubtedly come as something of a surprise, Mark has decided to leave the business.

Mark is looking forward to planning his next challenge and he does so with our support, best wishes and heartfelt thanks.

These changes take immediate effect."
 What does that mean for the GW hobbyists amongst us? Well by the sound of things the new boss will be just like the old boss (going on the assumption there job roles cross over so much). 

It's an interesting decision from an operations stnadpoint. To borrow from Wikipeid a moment

CEO 
"A chief executive officer (CEO) is the highest-ranking corporate officer (executive) or administrator in charge of total management of an organization. An individual appointed as a CEO of a corporation, company, organization, or agency typically reports to the board of directors. In British English, terms often used as synonyms for CEO are managing director (MD)[1] and chief executive (CE).[2]

The responsibilities of an organization's CEO (Chief Executive Officer,US) or MD (Managing Director, UK) are set by the organization's board of directors or other authority, depending on the organization's legal structure. They can be far-reaching or quite limited and are typically enshrined in a formal delegation of authority.

Typically, the CEO/MD has responsibilities as a director, decision maker, leader, manager and executor. The communicator role can involve the press and the rest of the outside world, as well as the organization's management and employees; the decision-making role involves high-level decisions about policy and strategy. As a leader of the company, the CEO/MD advises the board of directors, motivates employees, and drives change within the organization. As a manager, the CEO/MD presides over the organization's day-to-day, month-to-month, and year-to-year operations.[3]"
Chairman 
"The chairman, also simply known as the chair,[1] is the highest officer of an organized group such as a board committee, or deliberative assembly. The person holding the office is typically elected or appointed by the members of the group. The chairman presides over meetings of the assembled group and conducts its business in an orderly fashion.[2] When the group is not in session, the officer's duties often include acting as its head, its representative to the outside world and its spokesperson...
  • Chairman and CEO – The CEO may also hold the title of chairman, in which case the board frequently names an independent member of the board as a lead director.
  • Executive chairman – An office separate from that of CEO, where the titleholder wields influence over company operations, such as Steve Case of AOL Time Warner and Douglas Flint of HSBC. In particular, the group chairmanship of HSBC is considered the top position of that institution, outranking the chief executive, and is responsible for leading the board and representing the company in meetings with government figures.[27][28] Prior to the creation of the group management board in 2006, HSBC's chairman essentially held the duties of a chief executive at an equivalent institution, while HSBC's chief executive served as the deputy. After the 2006 reorganization, the management cadre ran the business, while the chairman oversaw the controls of the business through compliance and audit and the direction of the business"

So it is a bit of an organisational shuffle. The only question is if we'll see its effects down the road.

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